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Nurses and HIV

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Bradley-Springer, L., Stevens, L., & Webb, A. (2010). Every nurse is an HIV nurse. AJN The American Journal of Nursing, 110(3), 32-39.

Chronic HIV infection could have implications for persons in different clinical care settings (Bradley-Springer, Stevens & Webb, 2010). Due to the evolution of the infection, every nurse needs to be able to prevent, test, and treat it. This would go a long way in providing high-quality care to patients across the world. The research article concentrated on addressing the following:

  1. The evolving epidemiology of the disease
  2. Testing recommendations
  3. Advancements in screening technology
  4. Correlation between HIV infection and aging
  5. Nursing implications of the disease

The evolving epidemiology of the disease

Persons contract HIV through unprotected sexual intercourse, contaminated blood transfusions, prenatal exposures, and in cases where infected mothers breastfeed their babies (Bradley-Springer et al., 2010). HIV infection leads to chronic progression that culminates in a weakened immune system of an individual. About thirty-three million people were estimated to be living with the virus in 2007 across the world.

In the same year, it was found that the disease caused two million deaths, which led to fifteen million orphans. In the United States of America alone, 1.1 million people were infected with the virus in 2006 (Bradley-Springer et al., 2010). Notably, the highest rates of infection are observed in gay persons who do not use protection in the US. In the nation, epidemiology keeps on changing because many cases go unreported every year.

Testing recommendations

Since 1987, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been updating methods of HIV testing to cater to the needs of consumers (Cameron, Gerber, Mbatha, Mutyabule & Swart, 2012). The CDC also updates-testing approaches to ensure that the ever-dynamic retrovirus is detected in infected human beings (Bradley-Springer et al., 2010).

Advancements in screening technology

It is recommended that all persons aged 13 to 64 years should be screened regularly. People undergoing TB treatment should also be screened regularly because the disease is strongly correlated with HIV infection (Brust et al., 2012). The screening technology relies on the use of antibody testing kits, which have high levels of precision, accuracy, and speed (Bradley-Springer et al., 2010).

Correlation between HIV infection and aging

With the current ARV approaches, HIV patients can live longer, but their lives are exemplified by morbidities. It has been shown that patients with chronic HIV infection are depressed, weak, and experience other symptoms such as headaches, muscle aches, and insomnia. There is a need to focus on adopting approaches to reduce the negative impacts of AIDS that are associated with decreased renal function due to aging (Bradley-Springer et al., 2010).

Nursing implications of the disease

The article recommends that all nurses should play a role in the control of the epidemic. Even those who do not handle HIV/AIDS patients could play important roles in ensuring that they make important information available to healthcare settings (Bradley-Springer et al., 2010). For example, they can detect symptoms early in patients. In addition, they can be instrumental in ensuring that patients adhere to medications (Bradley-Springer et al., 2010; Cameron et al., 2012).

Conclusion

In conclusion, HIV is a major public health concern across the world. The disease is difficult to control due to the evolution of the retrovirus. Testing and screening methods are updated regularly. Aging and increased morbidities of the infection have been correlated. Nurses are required to play crucial roles in controlling the epidemic.

References

Bradley-Springer, L., Stevens, L., & Webb, A. (2010). Every nurse is an HIV nurse. AJN The American Journal of Nursing, 110(3), 32-39.

Brust, J. C., Shah, N. S., Scott, M., Chaiyachati, K., Lygizos, M., van der Merwe, T. L.,… & Gandhi, N. R. (2012). Integrated, home-based treatment for MDR-TB and HIV in rural South Africa: an alternate model of care. The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 16(8), 998-1004.

Cameron, D., Gerber, A., Mbatha, M., Mutyabule, J., & Swart, H. (2012). Nurse initiation and maintenance of patients on antiretroviral therapy: Are nurses in primary care clinics initiating ART after attending NIMART training?. SAMJ: South African Medical Journal, 102(2), 98-100.

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StudyKraken. (2022, August 27). Nurses and HIV. Retrieved from https://studykraken.com/nurses-and-hiv/

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StudyKraken. (2022, August 27). Nurses and HIV. https://studykraken.com/nurses-and-hiv/

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"Nurses and HIV." StudyKraken, 27 Aug. 2022, studykraken.com/nurses-and-hiv/.

1. StudyKraken. "Nurses and HIV." August 27, 2022. https://studykraken.com/nurses-and-hiv/.


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StudyKraken. "Nurses and HIV." August 27, 2022. https://studykraken.com/nurses-and-hiv/.

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StudyKraken. 2022. "Nurses and HIV." August 27, 2022. https://studykraken.com/nurses-and-hiv/.

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StudyKraken. (2022) 'Nurses and HIV'. 27 August.

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